The Jazz Accordion

Now, there is a dissonant idea, rather on a par with the morphing of Calvin and Weber's Protestant work ethic into the chance to win high school qualifications via McDonalds. Anyway, viewer, I thought that I would sign in and leave a short instructional video for you.

It comes from the Lawrence Welk Show, which was a staple of post-war America. I thought of it today when I read the sublime headline on Salon.com, 'McCain Wins Florida Primary; Conservative Heads Explode'. Really, Salon's blogs from the campaign trail in the states have been almost as completely wrong as mine from the supreme vantage point of a small box flat in Putney, but probably much better written.

We now face a moment when America's federal state cannot really afford to pay its bills without the far east agreeing to the bond issues. It's a moment when every terrorist in the world wants to take a pop, and multiple governments have much the same approach, and where the two candidates most likely to win on their appeal to this mythical 'centre' invented by the lobbyists are loathed by their own side and only truly loved by the Defense industry. The working people's candidates, the uplifting or interesting or genuine candidates are being steadily pushed aside, and America's diminishing band of friends seem to be backing away towards the door. Oh, and the oil is running out and someone has swapped the world media baby food for celebrity chilli sauce, or the effect thereof anyway.

So, what we need is some white tie accordion music.

Michelle Malkin or Anne Coulter or one of those noodles have said that 'McCain abandoned Lincoln for Lawrence Welk'. Welk was of Alsatian/Lorraine heritage and never quite mastered the English idioms he deployed, but was reassuring and funny and if he had been Italian or Cypriot some arty type would have written a novel around him that would have been transposed by the British Channel 4.

Lady or Gentleman, for your delight (I left out the famous 'chicken song' video from the show because that really needs a very large quantity of something narcotic to make it make any sort of sense) here is a wholly inappropriate accordion rendering of 'Ain't she Sweet'. It has an indirect fame in that this is the song that the Beatles were asked to back in Germany that lifted them into the music industry.

Look at the rapt faces of the women dancing by. They suggest that not only would this sort of thing have wowed 'em on the Titanic, but that really attractive dames dig it multo much. It's got my harmonica out in any event, and I'm not putting it back.

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