Why so many earthquakes and volcano stories?

I pretend to no geological knowledge. I also note that ice at the poles is melting in some areas, and, paradoxically, building up in others. However, I do remember this piece from a few years ago, which suggested that when the weight of ice was redistributed from the poles, tectonic plates would shift more and earthquakes and volcanoes would follow.

Is this happening? The 'American Thinker' certainly seems to think so, and proffers the existence of a verified underwater volcano beneath iceland as a better explanation for global warming in the arctic than man-made climate change.

I know that there are some geographers who read the blog, and would be grateful for clear scientific explanations. This fortnight alone, there have been revelations about large and ongoing undersea volcanoes which may be affecting the gulf stream which warms this country, undermining the atlantic conveyor and putting us in line to be colder. Other teams of scientists have discovered active underwater volcanoes near Fiji.

There have also been stories about explosions in Hawaii which have now made the mainstream media. This has become a planet of slums and there are a great many people to be affected by earthquakes compared to the past, but I note the frequency of tsunami and earthquakes in asia.

Data seem to suggest that the decade has not been noticeably more 'quakeful' than previous ones, but serious surveys now estimate that there are, perfectly naturally, some 50 earthquakes a day across the world in normal time.

Anybody got any ideas about what is going on? Are the feared methane and carbon dioxide releases from the earth which some have mooted over the past decade starting?

I hope that this puts an end to the dangerous idea of carbon sinks which some policymakers are flirting with, even if it were technologically feasible. Australia and the USA, in pursuit of kyoto-head credit, are going forward with sequestration tests which, if the undersea world is more volcanic and mobile than thought, may well turn out to be a serious mistake as well as a waste of money.

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